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Ten Commandments for Becoming a Leader




@DrJanice: You don't need anyone's permission to lead. #leadership
There are 10 commandments for becoming a leader. I didn’t get them off of tablets. But they will get you to your promised land.
  1. Be compassionate: don’t place people in tempting circumstances.
  2. Assume that people have the best interests of the organization in their intentions.
  3. Be forgiving, even when people make mistakes.
  4. Be merciful when people make big mistakes.
  5. Be gracious, even to those who don’t return it.
  6. Be slow to anger when people disobey.
  7. Be abundantly kind and assume people mean well.
  8. Never renege on your word.
  9. Remember the times when people do something right.
  10. Always allow people to repent their error, carelessness or apathy, and forgive them.
By the way, even if you decide you’d rather not be a leader, follow these anyway. You’ll have a more satisfying, less stressful life.

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