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Teamability: The ability to be a great team player.


Everyone wants great team players. What can you do to be a better one? Try answering these questions and you’ll generate your own personalized tips:
  1. Think back over all your job experiences – both paid and volunteer work. What really made you feel good? Make a list. Can you find some similarities? There’s an excellent chance that you’ll team best when doing the same types of tasks, with similar responsibilities, in comparable work environments.  Maybe you can swap some of your favorites with a co-worker!
  2. You don’t have to be a manager to help your teammates. Does someone need a hand with something that you can offer? Go for it! You’ll have fun doing it, and they’ll be grateful that they have you on the team.
  3. There’s really no better gift than honest, caring, respectful feedback. Is there someone you trust to give you some?  If so, go ahead and ask. In fact, your first question should be for feedback on how you team!
  4. You probably have a good sense of how you make your best contributions to your team, but don’t assume that others know it. Are there some ways you can advertise your readiness to take on job challenges that really fit you?
  5. Learning doesn’t stop when you graduate from school, finish training, or reach a goal. There are always opportunities to develop a new talent, skill, ability, or interest. Are you seeking out the ones that will benefit you while bringing benefits to others?

What will your future look like? With greater Teamability, you’ll have broader options, plus the flexibility and support to see them through to a successful conclusion!

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